page.section.full_url = {{ page.section.full_url or home }}
Satellite imagery from our Aqua satellite and the Suomi NPP satellite have provided different data on the still Category 5 Hurricane Irma as it headed for the Turks and Caicos Islands. We continue to provide satellite imagery for Irma, tracking its trajectory, force and precipitation to inform forecasters at the National Hurricane Center. As the category 5 storm approaches the Bahamas and Florida in the coming days, it will be passing over waters that are warmer than 30 degrees Celsius (86 degrees Fahrenheit)—hot enough to sustain a category 5 storm. Warm oceans, along with low wind shear, are two key ingredients that fuel and sustain hurricanes. Learn more at www.nasa.gov/hurricane For information on making preparations for Harvey, visit the FEMA website at: ready.gov/hurricanes Credit: NASA
The Conversation
Don’t miss a thing
What matters in tech, in your inbox daily
SocialUX
Follow us on
What do you think this tadpole-shaped impact crater says about the water that used to fill it? Based on the terrain-height information and knowing that water always flows downhill, scientists were able to infer that the water in the tadpole crater was flowing down, and outward. The image was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on our Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona #nasa #space mars

Section 1