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Bursts of blue throughout the spiral arms are regions filled with young stars glowing brightly in ultraviolet light, while redder areas are filled with older stars emitting in the cooler near-infrared. But there is more in this galaxy than meets the eye. At 150 million light-years from Earth, astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) highlighted NGC 6753 as one of only two known spiral galaxies that are both massive enough and close enough to make detailed observations of their coronas. Galactic coronas are huge, invisible regions of hot gas that surround a galaxy’s visible bulk, forming a spheroidal shape. Coronas are so hot that they can be detected by their X-ray emission, far beyond the optical radius of the galaxy. Because they are so wispy, these coronas are extremely difficult to detect. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA
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What do you think this tadpole-shaped impact crater says about the water that used to fill it? Based on the terrain-height information and knowing that water always flows downhill, scientists were able to infer that the water in the tadpole crater was flowing down, and outward. The image was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on our Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona #nasa #space mars