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In it, you can see a massive counterclockwise rotating storm that appears as a white oven in the gas giant’s southern hemisphere. Early in the morning on May 19, the Juno spacecraft made its fifth science flyby over these cloud tops, and got as close as about 2,100 miles. Juno is probing beneath the obscuring cloud cover of Jupiter and studying auroras to learn more about the planet’s origins, structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere. At the time of perijove (defined as the point in Juno’s orbit when it is closest to the plent’s center), the spacecraft had logged 63.5 million miles in Jupiter’s orbit. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Bjorn Jonsson
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