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If administered promptly enough, naloxone can chemically reverse an opioid overdose and save a person’s life. However, timing is critical–quicker administration of the medication can not only save a life, but also reduce the chances that brain damage will occur.

In exploring new ways to administer naloxone faster, a team of researchers has harnessed an effective, community-based approach. It involves an app for volunteers, who receive an alert when another app user nearby indicates that an overdose is occurring and naloxone is needed. The volunteers then have the opportunity to respond to the request.

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Image: MIT Lincoln Laboratory

To enable safe and affordable autonomous vehicles, the automotive industry needs lidar systems that are around the size of a wallet, cost one hundred dollars, and can see targets at long distances with high resolution. With the support of DARPA, our team at Kyber Photonics, in Lexington, Mass., is advancing the next generation of lidar sensors by developing a new solid-state, lidar-on-a-chip architecture that was recently demonstrated at MIT. The technology has an extremely wide field of view, a simplified control approach compared to the state-of-the-art designs, and has the promise to scale to millions of units via the wafer-scale fabrication methods of the integrated photonics industry.

 

Light detection and ranging (lidar) sensors hold great promise for allowing autonomous machines to see and navigate the world with very high precision. But current technology suffers from several drawbacks that need to be addressed before widespread adoption can occur. Lidar sensors provide spatial information by scanning an optical beam, typically in the wavelength range between 850 and 1550 nm, and using the reflected optical signals to build a three-dimensional map of an area of interest. They complement cameras and radar by providing high resolution and unambiguous ranging and velocity information under both daytime and nighttime conditions.

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