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Throughout the continent, the Moon will cover part – or all – of the Sun’s super-bright face for part of the day. For those within the narrow path of totality, stretching from Oregon to South Carolina, that partial eclipse will become total for a few brief moments. Make sure you’re using proper solar filters (not sunglasses) or an indirect viewing method if you plan to watch the eclipse in person. Wherever you are, you can also watch Monday’s eclipse online with us at http://www.nasa.gov/eclipselive. Starting Monday, Aug. 21, 2017 at noon ET, our show will feature views from our research aircraft, high-altitude balloons, satellites and specially modified telescopes, as well as live reports from cities across the country and the International Space Station. Learn all about #Eclipse2017 at http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov.
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A single, tiny one appeared on Jan. 31, but even that is hard to see in this rotating view from our Solar Dynamics Observatory. The video shows a rotating sun in filtered light for the past week, but it is even hard to tell the sun is rotating since there are just about no features. This spotless period is a prelude to the approaching period of solar minimum next year, when the Sun’s activity will be at the low end of its 11-year cycle. Credit: NASA/SDO
The federal government gave the National Energy Board until February 22, 2019, to complete its review of the potential impacts of the proposed Trans Mountain pipeline expansion.