page.section.full_url = {{ page.section.full_url or home }}
Our Suomi NPP satellite captured this thermal image of Hurricane Maria early Wednesday morning. At the time, Maria’s eye was just east of the U.S. Virgin Islands, and its northwester quadrant stretched over Puerto Rico. This image shows very cold cloud top temperatures in the powerful thunderstorms in Maria’s eyewall. Rainfall analysis from another satellite (our Global Precipitation Measurement mission) found that some extreme storms within the hurricane’s feeder bands were dropping rain at a rate of greater than 5.4 inches per hour. Credit: NASA Goddard Rapid Response Team
The Conversation
Don’t miss a thing
What matters in tech, in your inbox daily
SocialUX
Follow us on
Astronomers took this image as they were observing an extraordinary exploding star – a supernova – near the galaxy’s central yellow core! The star rapidly evolved from a supernova containing very little hydrogen to one that is hydrogen-rich — in just one year. This rarely observed metamorphosis was luminous at high energies and provides unique insight into the poorly understood final phases of massive stars. By studying similar galaxies we hold a scientific mirror up to our own, allowing us to build a better understanding of our galactic environment, which we cannot always observe, and of galactic behavior and evolution as a whole. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA/D. Milisavljevic (Perdue University)
Rhea is a heavily-cratered, airless world, while Titan’s nitrogen-rich atmosphere is even thicker than Earth’s. This natural color image was taken in visible light by the Cassini spacecraft on Nov. 19, 2009, at a distance of approximately 713,300 miles (1,148,000 kilometers) from Rhea. After a nearly 20-year mission that overflowed with discoveries, the Cassini spacecraft ended its mission on Sept. 15, 2017. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute