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NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik (@astrokomrade) captured this timelapse video from his unique vantage point on the International Space Station (@iss) , 250 miles above our home planet. He posted it to his social media accounts on Oct. 1 saying, “Desert sands, wispy clouds, and blue ocean, the cupola fish-eye spies many features along the spine of Africa in this #timelapse.” There are currently six people living and working on the space station, which is orbiting our planet at 17,500 mph. They are conducting important science and research on the orbiting laboratory that will not only help us send humans to deep space destinations, like Mars, but also has direct benefits to live here on Earth. Credit: NASA
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What do you think this tadpole-shaped impact crater says about the water that used to fill it? Based on the terrain-height information and knowing that water always flows downhill, scientists were able to infer that the water in the tadpole crater was flowing down, and outward. The image was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on our Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona #nasa #space mars