page.section.full_url = {{ page.section.full_url or home }}

Earth or Mars?

Although it could be mistaken for a desert on Earth, layers seen in this image are evidence of erosion on the Red Planet. This erosion has even produced several small mesas & a prominent channel that cuts through this region of the planet: The map is projected here at a scale of 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) per pixel. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona
Hello 1517267959 - 94419211
The Conversation
Don’t miss a thing
What matters in tech, in your inbox daily
SocialUX
Follow us on
Photo: iStockphoto
Journal Watch report logo, link to report landing page

If administered promptly enough, naloxone can chemically reverse an opioid overdose and save a person’s life. However, timing is critical–quicker administration of the medication can not only save a life, but also reduce the chances that brain damage will occur.

In exploring new ways to administer naloxone faster, a team of researchers has harnessed an effective, community-based approach. It involves an app for volunteers, who receive an alert when another app user nearby indicates that an overdose is occurring and naloxone is needed. The volunteers then have the opportunity to respond to the request.

Keep reading... Show less

Researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology are leveraging some of the newest mechanical and robotic technologies to help some of our oldest populations stay healthy, active, and independent.

Yi Guo, professor of electrical and computer engineering and director of the Robotics and Automation Laboratory, and Damiano Zanotto, assistant professor of mechanical engineering, and director of the Wearable Robotic Systems Laboratory, are collaborating with Ashley Lytle, assistant professor in Stevens’ College of Arts and Letters, and Ashwini K. Rao of Columbia University Medical Center, to combine an assistive mobile robot companion with wearable in-shoe sensors in a system designed to help elderly individuals maintain the balance and motion they need to thrive.

Keep reading... Show less